My plan for West of England buses


Bus services have been upsetting people for decades in the West of England. In my 25 years in politics in Bristol they have been a constant feature on the doorstep and in my mail. They are costly compared to many other cities. They don’t run late enough to the towns and villages in Gloucestershire and Somerset. In most cases they only take cash, slowing up the journey and causing hold ups along the route for other people. As they are all diesel propelled they contribute to poor air quality in both Bath and Bristol.

There has been very little that local politicians can do about these problems. Until now. The election of the West of England region’s first “Metro” Mayor will be followed by the awarding of new transport powers by central government. The Metro Mayor will be able to set franchises for bus services and insist on integrated and smart ticketing. This means that any bus company that wants to operate in the region will have to agree to the Mayor’s terms and conditions.

This is a big opportunity to transform local bus services. I have several ideas:

• A rapid move to a cashless payment system. This would include people being able to pay on entry to the bus with their debit card, a smart phone as well as other dedicated pre-paid cards and concession passes.
• A review of late night buses to the towns and villages around Bristol and Bath. This would take account of the needs of employees working late at various locations (eg Cribbs Causeway) and of people enjoying an evening out in both our cities.
• A review of Park and Ride sites and services. In some areas park and ride is an appropriate intervention to take cars off the roads into both cities. They work well at Newbridge and Brislington on the A4. The case for new sites should be rigorously tested to make sure that extra car journeys are not being created in the countryside and that air pollution is being reduced in the cities. Secure cycle parking facilities should also be available at all sites. Later services should be introduced for people leaving the theatres and other attractions of Bath and Bristol.
• Greater integration between bus routes and railway stations. Making sure that the three mainline rail stations are well served by buses. Some local stations could be better linked to the bus network. I plan to open a new rail station at Charfield, in the north of the region. To avoid an increase in rural car journeys this would be supported by a dedicated bus link to Wotton under Edge, the nearest town.
• A move to cleaner fuel and electric powered buses. Diesel fumes are a major public health issue. I will work with the Mayor of London and the other English regional Metro Mayors to develop a market for cleaner buses.
• Increased confidence in the timetable and information at the bus stop and on board. Buses should run to the published timetable but it is useful to know the real time arrival of the next bus when there are delays. Signage and voice information on board buses should be clear and take account of everyone’s needs.
• Making a success of “Metro Bus” in 2017. We’ve been enduring the disruptive roadworks and now we need to see the benefit of this huge investment in a dedicated route. I will consider carefully the case for further bus based rapid transit, for instance to Yate and Thornbury.

I will be publishing a full manifesto at the end of March and in the meantime would welcome feedback and other ideas for how we can get a high quality, reliable bus service.


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